embroidery stand part 1

For more than a year I’ve been using an embroidery stand which is a mixture of parts from a Siesta Sonata seatstand and a Siesta Stitchmaster seatstand because individually, each one had failed in some way. The hybrid has been modified and tweaked as different problems or needs have arisen, but the older it becomes the more it now requires regular first aid of some kind.

lapstand-setup-2

lapstand-setup-4

I prefer a hoop to a frame but gradual hoop droop is a common problem with any stand due to wingnuts frequently slackening, and recent first aid at the point where the horizontal bar and the side arm connect, now prohibits the full pivoting range the bar was previously capable of, thereby restricting access to the underside of the work.  Is it too arrogant of me to suggest that the basic design of the average embroidery stand is the problem, in particular the joints and fitments? Could it be that the designers are mainly people who do not embroider or understand the needs of the embroiderer? (I would be delighted to be proved wrong, so if any manufacturer out there would like to send me any of their stands to test and review, feel free to get in touch!)

As my hotch-potch of a stand could soon require major repairs that I am not capable of undertaking, I began looking for its future replacement using the following criteria:

  1. it should not require a second mortgage to pay for it.
  2. if purchased from overseas, shipping costs should not be almost as much as the cost of the stand.
  3. it should securely hold a hoop or a frame equally well.
  4. I should be able to easily swivel or flip the hoop or frame to access the back of the work.
  5. the height and angle of work should be adjustable.
  6. it should be comfortable and stable on my lap no matter how I sit or which chair I choose.
  7. if a floor stand, it should not dominate the room.
  8. it should be strong and stable but not too heavy.
  9. the joints/bolts/wingnuts should remain firm until I choose to loosen them.
  10. is should be easy to set up and dismantle.

I think my criteria are easily met but after many, many hours of internet browsing and reading as many reviews as I could find, several American makes were excluded due to a high purchase price and or shipping costs or nil deliveries to the UK, as were any lap or seat stands that were designed only for frames. It was becoming depressing. I wondered if I couldn’t design a stand myself. I knew what I wanted, I had pencils and paper…

Over the following weeks I became frustrated at not being able to translate the ideas in my head into any kind of viable reality for “Mrs G’s Ultimate Embroidery Stand” (spoken in the same way as the voice said “Herge’s Adventures of Tin Tin” at the start of the tv programme many years ago). Once or twice I felt I was close to success but a foamboard mini-prototype could only take me so far, foamboard being good, but not that good.  What I really need is an engineer, or a carpenter, who can tune into my brain or interpret my doodles and go “Ah! I know what you want and how to make it”. Sadly, I know that this is unlikely to ever happen so I reconsidered the shortlist and on Tuesday morning succumbed to the little devil on my shoulder and ordered a Lowery Workstand from SewandSo.co.uk. It arrived within a mere 24 hours(!) and I will tell you all about it in part 2.

lowery

 

 

 

 

2 Responses to “embroidery stand part 1”

  1. wendy Says:

    I have the Lowry and love it! I loved it so much that mum bought herself one too. i was going to offer to sell it to you but I see you have that covered!

    • Mrs G Says:

      Thanks for thinking of me! I’ve never read a review about the Lowery that wasn’t positive. I liked your sashiko bunny but you couldn’t have stitched it on the Lowery!


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