new books

I bought the following with a recent birthday gift voucher and I think one will form the basis of my next project although I’m not sure which one. Any suggestions?

I haven’t been able to find the post/article where I saw this book mentioned recently but I was intrigued enough to buy a copy. It’s a 1985 edition, mainly printed in black and white but the diagrams and photographs are very clear and seem easy to follow.

 

A idea for a modern style of raised embroidery on a casket/box has been brewing in my mind for a while and the following two books might help me formulate a proper plan.

 

The last item is a gel printing plate. I’ve got lots of acrylic paint and medium to turn it into fabric paint, and I’ve begun collecting things with textured surfaces to use as stencils and mark makers. Any successful printed fabric will be used for future textile projects – perhaps even for the covering of a box or a bag! My brayer will be wiped of paint onto my sketchbook pages to help avoid the dreaded blank page syndrome.

needle weaving

These needle weaving samples were for a module on Sue Stone’s course using different yarns/threads for both warp and weft and varying the spacing etc. Some samples are anchored to the fabric at top and bottom only.

This module took me back many years to when I was a student at the (then) Scottish College of Textiles in Galashiels, studying for a diploma in Textile Design and used a full-sized dobby loom to weave much larger pieces than these 5 x 5 cm samples. I can hardly remember why I chose to drop out halfway through the three year course but the reasons for doing so seemed extremely valid at the time and a regret I learned to live with. Much water has passed under the bridge since then but I’ve never forgotten how to do plain and twill weave.

Watercress

I left the seed pod in Watercress for this morning when I could use the magnifying lamp to assist with the needlelace, finished it, took some photos and then realised that I’d forgotten to do the two small needle-woven leaves at the bottom of the stem but they’re done now. The next one to do is Coriander. Bet you can’t wait!

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