8 days later

A new card reader was received by post last week but it wasn’t what I had ordered so it’s now about to be returned. Fortunately I had also ordered another from a different supplier and it arrived on Saturday. The second reader was the correct kind so I’m happily transferring images from camera to computer once more.

Here are two more of the fabric bowls I made last week. More to see tomorrow!

blue beige basket b

blue and red bowl

another pot

Instead of sewing anything new last week, I framed a few existing pieces and hung them on the loo walls like a mini gallery exhibition. I plan to hang more but I’m not sure what JP will think when there are more stitchy pieces visible than walls!

 

I made this pot yesterday. As usual, I didn’t really have a plan of action when I started and I got fed up just going round and round so I had a ‘what if I try ….’ episode and this twirly top was the result. Several times my sewing machine protested loudly and then ‘shut down for safety’ but I hand-cranked the needle until it decided to play again. We’re still friends.

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portrait three

Yesterday I began a third stumpwork portrait, another man this time, wearing a striped blazer and carrying or wearing a straw boater. I tried the Jan Messent method for his hat-holding hand but I wasn’t happy with the result. To give the fingers form, the book says to use “cord or smooth string no thicker than 1mm (1/16in)” but I used a soft crochet cotton of a similar diameter which I only had in a green shade. It all went well until the final stitching around and between the fingers. I used fine 100% nylon lingerie and bobbin thread so that I could make really small stitches and the book doesn’t give any suggestion as to what to use. I’m not sure if the lingerie thread was the main fault or I just didn’t take enough care over it (I really shouldn’t watch television and stitch at the same time I know) but it’s not suitable for this portrait anyway. A hand in this position is more often seen resting on a lady’s lap and not for doffing a hat, which is my intention.

 

I promised photographs if I ever made a hand the Messent way so here’s three in one, showing the process. Top left: lay a piece of stiff vilene on a base fabric, draw a hand and fingers outline then lightly glue the cord fingers in place. Lower left: add a little light padding over the back of the hand when the glue is dry then cover with the actual hand fabric. Centre: stitch around and between the fingers using small back stitches. Cut out close to the outline stitching using fabric glue/fray stop on any raw threads.

hand

 

On the other hand (ha ha), here’s the stumpwork hand which is much better for my purpose. Each finger wire was bound with two strands of embroidery thread then the tip was bent over and the whole finger bound with thread from the tip all the way down to the “wrist” before securing the thread end. All the fingers and thumb were then bound together. With this method it’s possible to shape the fingers with small pliers to make the hand more realistic. I’d never made one of these hands before and I didn’t pay too much attention when I was wrapping the hand itself (blame Foyle’s War for that) so it’s a bit rough and ready. Still, it was only a test and I like how they could be made larger or smaller depending on the gauge of wire used or how finely or thickly they were wrapped. I still think that there’s something about these hands that make them look a little creepy, but we can’t have everything, can we?

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beady beady

This weekend I had a go at making hand-rolled felt beads but I didn’t plan the embellishment well at all beforehand. Instead I just selected lots of different coloured beads and co-ordinating embroidery threads and made up the patterns as I went along. I quite enjoyed making them but I think more than one in the same pattern or colour way is needed.